Lego Ninjago Movie Display at Tempe Marketplace

Cactus Brick will have a large Lego Ninjago movie display at Tempe Marketplace (across from Just Sports, suite #1234).

The dates that the display will be open are:

Friday, Sept 15: 6-9PM
Saturday, Sept 16: 12-9PM
Sunday, Sept 17: 12-6Pm
Wednesday, Sept 20: 5-9PM
Friday, Sept 22: 6-9PM
Saturday, Sept 23: 11AM-9PM
Sunday, Sept 24: 12-6PM

The Lego Ninjago characters will only be at the display on Wednesday, Sept 20 from 7PM to 8:30PM.

Cactus Brick’s Lego Ninjago Movie themed display at Tempe Marketplace

Desert Ridge Display (Oct 23 to Nov 29)

We will have a display in Desert Ridge Marketplace (Tatum & 101) from Oct 23 to Nov 29.

Flyer for the November 2015 Desert Ridge Display
Flyer for the November 2015 Desert Ridge Display

Phoenix Comicon 2014

We were at Phoenix Comicon 2014 this year in the exhibitor hall (next to the Star Wars guys). This was our largest display ever.

Tempe Marketplace Display — Feb 6 to Feb 9, 2014

Cactus Brick had a display at Tempe Marketplace on Feb 6 to Feb 9, 2014. The display was our largest city/train layout we have ever done. This event was to help promote THE LEGO MOVIE which opened on Feb 7th. We had Emmet and Wyldstyle from Legoland on Thursday and Friday.

Come See Cactus Brick at Phoenix Comicon May 24-27

Cactus Brick will be displaying a 15 foot by 40 foot display of custom LEGO creations at the Phoenix Comicon May 24th to May 27th. The display will include a town with over 200 square feet of towering buildings and speeding locomotives. In addition, the display will contain static models from all genres of science fiction and comics. Comicon is open to the public and kids twelve and under are free with a paying adult. To learn more please visit the Phoenix Comicon website.

Cactus Brick to Display at Phoenix Comicon

Cactus Brick will be displaying a 15 foot by 15 foot display of custom LEGO creations at the Phoenix Comicon May 26th to May 29th. The display will include a town with over 50 square feet of towering buildings and speeding locomotives. In addition, the display will contain static models from all genres of science fiction and comics. Comicon is open to the public and kids twelve and under are free with a paying adult. To learn more please visit the Phoenix Comicon website.

Update:
Here are some pictures from the event.

Thursday May 26th, 2011

Sunday May 29th, 2011

Lego Diagonal Connection Points

Lego Diagonal Connection Points (From Origin)

Many fans of Lego are aware of the geometry of the brick, such as the fact that a standard brick has a 5/6 width to height relationship. Much has been written about the height of five stacked plates being the exact width of two bricks. Understanding the geometry of the brick is an essential skill in advanced construction techniques. With that said, there seems to be little attention paid to the need to occasionally connect some creation or another on a diagonal line. This technique is arguably less useful than the aforementioned height / width relationship, but the following information may prove valuable to some.

When attempting to connect a length of brick (such as a wall, etc) in a diagonal orientation, it is useful to know where the studs will line up. Whether or not they’ll line up depends on the length of the hypotenuse (the long edge on a right triangle). If the hypotenuse happens to be the exact distance of any multiple of the width of a brick, the studs line up. The formula for determining the hypotenuse is the trusty old Pythagorean Theorem. Considering we’re always working with right triangles, we simply count the number of studs on the length and width axis. Subtract one from both length and width. Then use the following formula to determine if the particular point has a hypotenuse which lines up.

Formula To Calculate Hypotenuse

For example, the smallest point at which the studs all align for a clean diagonal fit using a standard baseplate grid is a rectangle with the dimensions of 4 x 5. A 6 stud length of brick closes the hypotenuse, as shown below. The calculation can be a bit confusing because the actual measurement to find the hypotenuse is taken from stud center to stud center, rather than the typical measurement from outside edge to outside edge, as seen in the figure to the right.

Carrying on the example in the figure, the length is 4 bricks and the width is 5 bricks. Subtract 1 from both to find the stud center to stud center length/width values (3 x 4). Then plug them into the equation above to arrive at:

We end up with a hypotenuse of 5 studs. Again, measured stud center to stud center. With this knowledge in hand, we can set out to calculate the direct line length from the point of origin to any other point on the grid. While the task may be relatively simple, the scope can be a bit daunting. After all, on a standard 48 x 48 stud baseplate that would require running the calculation for 2209 possible points! That is why I’ve come up with this guide to show exactly where those points are on the 48 x 48 baseplate.

Here is a top-down view of a standard 48 x 48 baseplate with each possible connection point shown with a different color 1 x 1 round plate. The lower left corner is the initial point of origin. The plates that are the same color are on the same plane. That is, they’re simply another step using the same calculations as the previous step, but using the last connection point to represent a new point of origin.

Lego Diagonal Connection Points (Top Down View)

The following table shows each of the possible connections (by color) and their dimensions. The first value in each box is the stud center to stud center measurement, while the value in parenthesis (the “Real” value) is the distance in bricks.

Length (Real) Width (Real) Hypotenuse (Real)
3 (4) 4 (5) 5 (6)
5 (6) 12 (13) 13 (14)
7 (8) 24 (25) 25 (26)
8 (9) 15 (16) 16 (17)
9 (10) 40 (41) 41 (42)
12 (13) 35 (36) 36 (37)
20 (21) 21 (22) 28 (29)
28 (29) 45 (46) 53 (54)